ORC ID , Neda Haghighi2, Tahereh Gilvari3, Sahar Haghighat4">
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 1-6

Effect of changing position and early mobilization on back pain and vascular side effects in patients after coronary angiography


1 Department of Medical-Surgical Nursing, Nasibe Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran
2 Department of Medical-Surgical Nursing, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Alborz Islamic Azad University, Alborz, Iran
3 Department of Medical-Surgical Nursing, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Semnan, Iran
4 Master of Nursing, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Masoumeh Neishabouri
School of Nursing and Midwifery, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/JNMS.JNMS_22_18

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Context: Angiography is associated with vascular complications such as bleeding and hematoma. To prevent these complications, patients are restricted to bed rest in the supine position after the procedure. This practice has been associated with back pain. Aims: This research has been carried out to evaluate the effect of changing position and early mobilization on back pain and vascular side effects in patients after coronary angiography. Setting and Design: This study was a randomized controlled clinical trial conducted in 2016 at Taleghani Hospital, Tehran. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 120 patients. Each patient was assigned in groups with simple random allocation to either the control group, which remained the supine position 6 h of bed rest after coronary angiography, or intervention group. The intervention group was changed position hourly, varying between supine, elevated to 30°, and semi position (elevated to 45°) during the first 4 h after coronary angiography. Data collected with demographic questionnaire checklist for complications based on Christnson's Guideline, McGill Pain Questionnaire, and Numeric Pain Intensity Scale. Statistical Analysis Used: All data obtained were analyzed using descriptive statistics (frequency, mean, and standard deviation) and inferential statistics (Chi-square and Mann–Whitney U test). Results: The results showed that the mean pain intensity immediately after entering the postangiographic section in the control groups was 0.9 ± 0.34 and in the intervention group was 0.28 ± 1.22. There were significantly less pain intensity and extent back pain in the intervention group than the control group (P < 0.001). Furthermore, the highest severity of back pain in patients undergoing cardiac angiography in the intervention and control group was 2.43 ± 1.32 and 4.88 ± 1.78, respectively (P < 0.001). None of the patients developed bleeding, hematoma, and arterial thrombosis; therefore, there was no significant difference between the two groups. Conclusion: The recent postcardiac angiography changing position and early mobilization on back pain and vascular side effects in patients without any increase in the vascular side effects may results prevention of back pain and decrease in its extent.


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